Online Video Resources

For the past year, in partnership with the Toolbox for Education and Social Action and with the support of the CHS Foundation, NASCO staff have been creating cooperative educational videos on a variety of key topics. We’re quite happy to announce that forty videos have been produced to date and are now available on our website.

Submit Resources to our Library

One of the most valuable assets of the cooperative movement is our collective knowledge, and NASCO’s Shared Resource Library, a constantly growing collection of documents and files, is a tool for sharing that knowledge. Our library relies upon your contributions. Please follow this link to share your co-op’s governance documents, member education materials, and resources.

Join Sasona Cooperative for a weekend with Laird Schaub

Laird is a nationally recognized facilitator, group process consultant, teacher, and author. Since 1987, he’s been assisting cooperative groups all over North America. During 1997-2015 he was also a regular part of the teaching faculty for NASCO Institute.

Laird will be in Austin November 16-18, giving a series of three (3) two-hour presentations on various aspects of group dynamics and how cooperative groups can function more effectively:

Three Excellent Cooperators Join NASCO Hall of Fame

The NASCO Cooperative Hall of Fame, created in 1989, honors the best of our movement.  We use the Hall of Fame as a means for NASCO member co-ops to provide broader recognition to individuals who have made a truly significant impact. This year, a committee of former Hall of Fame inductees and NASCO board members selected three individuals to join the Hall of Fame:Sheella Mierson, Educator“I owe my existence to a cooperative,” is what Sheella Mierson once said in reference to her parents’ meeting at the Co-op Youth League in Chicago in the 40’s.

Join the NASCO Board of Directors

Are you excited about the cooperative movement and eager to participate in the world of cooperatives beyond your home cooperative?

Do you have experience with board governance, grassroots fundraising, meeting facilitation, co-op management, or committee leadership? 

Do you want to be part of a bi-national organization that develops new cooperatives, manages common equity houses, and reaches thousands of cooperators in the U.S. and Canada with cooperative education?

Annual Member Survey

NASCO member co-ops only– we're conducting our second Annual Member Survey! Your responses help us understand our membership, ensure our programming meets our members' needs, and advocate for the positive impacts of co-ops on individuals and communities.

Every individual who completes a survey will be entered into a drawing to win one of the following prizes:

Welcoming our Director of Development Services!

As summer comes to an end, Corrigan Nadon-Nichols, our Director of Development, is stepping down from his position. During his five years on staff, Corrigan has made some enormous contributions to NASCO. He will surely be missed! However, he won’t be going far as he is moving on to exciting opportunities in the local Chicago cooperative movement. Supporting our staff as well as members to grow and evolve is part of our work at NASCO. We are sad to say goodbye to Corrigan, and we wish him happiness and success!

NASCO Today

NASCO launched several new property ownership programs, including Lots in Common and NASCO Community Ownership.  Lots in Common has been spun off from NASCO’s staffing, and NASCO Community Ownership went under due to the financial crisis of 2008.

The NASCO boards and staff worked together to create a contract for setting expectations of staff. Several large cooperatives in the US withdrew from NASCO membership, while several large cooperatives in Canada rejoined.

Fourth Decade

NASCO developed a focus on diversity and inclusion, both in governance and in its educational programming. A number of community-based cooperatives became members of NASCO, bringing new points of view. By 2005, about half of the member groups were community-based, although student groups were still much larger and held about 90% of the individual co-op members.