Incorporation

Six successful 501(c)3 applications (Form 1023)

This archive contains the Form 1023s and supporting documentation for the following six cooperatives that have successfully become not-for-profit organizations:
  • Bloomington Cooperative Living (Indiana, 2011)
  • CHÜVA - Cooperative Housing at the University of Virginia (Virginia, 2005)
  • Cooperative Roots (California, 2006)
  • Kalamazoo Collective Housing (

Incorporating and Getting 501c3 Status - Developing New Cooperatives

Presented by Daniel Miller (NASCO Staff) & David "Rosebud" Sparer (Herrick & Kasdorf, LLP)

Why do co-ops become legal corporations? What does it take to incorporate? What are the pros and cons of different legal statuses? What does non-profit status do for a co-op, and does your co-op qualify? These resources will help give answers to these questions and more, with specific examples to help your co-op.

NASCO Co-op Organizer's Handbook

The Organizer's Handbook is a comprehensive guide to creating group-equity housing cooperatives. By explaining the cooperative movement, campus and community organizing, nonprofit incorporation, financing, and housing development, this important resource demystifies a challenging project.

Sample Co-op Bylaws

These sample bylaw can give you an idea of some simple boilerplate language for incorporating your coop.  Of course, a coop should get these bylaws looked at before submitting them, but these should give you a good idea of what you may want to do, and let you change things where you need to do so in order to make these match your needs.